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Rohrer's farm in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

20210428-5K1A6217.dng

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Roger Rohrer holds an earthworm he found in a field of wheat planted with no-till methods on the farm he owns jointly with his two sons in Strasburg, Pa., on April 28, 2021. "As your tilling, that [earthworm] actually takes your poultry manure, your nutrients that are on top of the ground and works them down through the soil profile. And then the wheat roots, the corn roots will follow the cavity that these earthworms make. To me it’s a sign of healthy soil. Right there that’s exactly what no-till is all about right there—being able to get a good stand of the crop in amongst the residue that’s covering 90% of the soil surface." (Photo by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program)
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Chesapeake Bay Program
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www.chesapeakebay.net
Roger Rohrer holds an earthworm he found in a field of wheat planted with no-till methods on the farm he owns jointly with his two sons in Strasburg, Pa., on April 28, 2021. "As your tilling, that [earthworm] actually takes your poultry manure, your nutrients that are on top of the ground and works them down through the soil profile. And then the wheat roots, the corn roots will follow the cavity that these earthworms make. To me it’s a sign of healthy soil. Right there that’s exactly what no-till is all about right there—being able to get a good stand of the crop in amongst the residue that’s covering 90% of the soil surface." (Photo by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program)